Description:

CHEMICAL SENSING WITH FIBROUS MATERIAL

INV-14037

INVENTORS:  Timothy T. Ruckh, Mary K. Balaconis, Heather A. Clark

 

Description       

Conventionally, various types of sensors/sensing elements have been used for detection of physiological analytes.  Some of the most common ones are nanosensors and microworms.  Due to their reduced surface area, such sensors are associated with common limitations such as lower system stability and higher diffusion/cellular uptake rate.  Scalability/mass production and limited lifetime are some of the other limitations associated with current sensors.  This invention discloses the development and use of novel, fiber-based sensors that allow efficient and localized monitoring of physiological analytes (both in-vivo and in-vitro), potentially overcoming prior art limitations and/or unmet needs.

Value Proposition

The sensors:

•Are capable of being produced at a larger scale

•Are the first of its kind, electrospun optode-based sensors

•Are associated with minimized diffusion and cellular update

•Are capable of fluorescently tracking changes in specific analyte concentrations

•Have a high surface area to volume ratio, enabling a rapid response time and enhanced sensitivity as compared to        existing sensors

•Are more biocompatible and have enhanced surface area, allowing increased in-vivo monitoring times as compared        to prior art sensors

•Are capable of monitoring experimental conditions and cellular functions under different environments

•Would be commercially useful for the following applications:

oEnvironmental monitoring

oFood monitoring

oMonitoring of other physiological/biological analytes

 

Intellectual Property status

Provisional Application 61/893,587

License status

Available for license

 

Patent Information:
For Information, Contact:
Mark Saulich
Associate Director of Commercialization
Northeastern University
m.saulich@northeastern.edu
Inventors:
Timothy Ruckh
Heather Clark
Mary Katharine Balaconis
Keywords:
Diagnostics
Materials
Nanotechnology
Sensor Technology